At Kira Farm Development Centre just outside of Uganda’s capital, Kampala, 40 young people acquire life-changing skills over the course of one year.

All have grown up in extreme poverty, some were orphaned by HIV, others were forced to fight as child soldiers. All need a hand-up in life so they can support their families. At Kira they learn skills in tailoring, hairdressing, carpentry, construction, bike repairs and conservation farming. They also receive training in business, gender equality, conflict resolution and health and hygiene.

98% of Kira Farm graduates are employed or running their own business (compared with 17% of Uganda’s youth population)



'I was given a chance at Kira Farm and now I want to give these girls a chance,' Agnes

Two years ago Agnes set up a free tailoring school using the skills she acquired at Kira Farm.  ‘I advertised on the radio, encouraging girls to get skills to stop them from going to bed hungry,’ she explains.  Five young people have already graduated from Agnes’s school and found well-paid work as tailors. ‘Many of the girls are orphans, or had babies at a young age. I was given a chance at Kira Farm and now I want to give these girls a chance,’ smiles Agnes, an inspirational young woman.

 


'Without Kira Farm I would have spent my life digging other people’s land and fetching water,' Patrick
 
Patrick spent four years as a street kid after he was abandoned by his single mum when he was just six. At Kira Farm he learnt carpentry and when he graduated last year he set up a small workshop, making an income and passing on his skills to vulnerable people with a similar background to his own. ‘Without Kira I would have spent my life digging other people’s land and fetching water. God has done great things in my life and it is a nice feeling to pass on what I have been given,’ beams Patrick.